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POLITICAL NEWSLETTER

With just a week left in the legislative session, the leaders set out their broad parameters for how the money should be spent and said conference committees would determine specifics for how the funds would go out over the coming days.
Cory Hepola and Tamara Uselman will make public appearances together on Tuesday morning, May 17, in St. Paul and at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Moorhead Public Library.
Democrats in the GOP-led chamber said they moved to bring the bills to the floor without committee approval following the leak of a draft U.S. Supreme Court opinion on abortion.
The contracts of tens of thousands of state employees were approved last year and the Minnesota House of Representatives approved them but the Senate has not.

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Now, lawmakers from the House and Senate will meet to try and write a compromise bill that can please both Democrats and Republicans.
Hortman on Twitter said that she had minor symptoms and was vaccinated and boosted against COVID-19.
The proposals are likely to face opposition from Democrats who've proposed more targeted tax credits for groups that they say need them most.
Republicans who carried the bill said it would benefit families and small business owners, while Democrats said it wouldn't do enough to offer paid time for workers.
Department of Labor and Industry leaders said they'd contracted a vendor to build out the application website and planned to get it up and running in June.
The Minnesota Senate and House swiftly passed the funding after pulling the proposal out of a larger spending bill. It would help finish construction on three veterans' homes and provide bonuses to those who served after Sept. 11, 2001.

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Attorney General Keith Ellison said the additional attorneys could help take on complex criminal cases in Greater Minnesota that local prosecutors don't have the bandwidth to take.
Dozens of workers said they worked extensive overtime for two subcontractors on the project but never received compensation for that work.
Abortion rights groups have sued the state in an effort to repeal Minnesota laws that set a waiting period to access an abortion, require that physicians perform the procedures and mandates that clinics collect information about patients.

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