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INDIGENOUS IMPACTS

The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa’s 36-acre farm has seen several new additions in the last year.
"Indigenous Impacts: How Native American communities are responding to COVID-19" takes a deep dive into the effects of the coronavirus on Native American communities and individuals, and looks at how they are battling against the pandemic and the unique problems it poses to their people.
What’s next for Indian Country amid the pandemic? All eyes on are Washington, D.C. where key funding measures have stalled in Congress.
A new special report from Forum News Service aims to shine a light on the unique issues facing Native American communities during the pandemic and the resilient people meeting them head-on.

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A 19th century episode at Fort Clark marks just one early chapter in Native American public health history — a story that’s been marred for centuries by poor health outcomes that have outpaced the rest of the country. Native Americans have played quiet roles throughout American medical history, though rarely as healthy survivors.
Spirit Lake Reservation in North Dakota and Lake Traverse Reservation, which is mostly in South Dakota but extends into North Dakota, are Dakota Sioux reservations. Their stories illustrate why reservations were created -- originally with the intent to assimilate natives into mainstream society, but persist as vital places to preserve native culture and traditions and to enable self-determination.
Summer is the season of powwows, oodles of art fairs, and traditional ceremonies. But with the spread a pandemic, everything — even courting — has come to a halt. From business to dating to ceremony, Natives are hunkered down, faces covered, as COVID-19 sweeps its way through Indian Country.
About the author Denise K. Lajimodiere is an enrolled Citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa in Belcourt, N.D.
Pandemic. Pan Indian.

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This was my first year in my Ph.D. program. Having lived on my reservation in northern Minnesota for nearly my whole life, I overcame culture shock and many other barriers to complete my first semester in Fall 2019 at the U of M.
Grand Portage is a sleepy, picturesque part of Northern Minnesota, only miles south of the Canadian border at the end of Highway 61.
Across the Upper Midwest, Indigenous tribes are forging unique ways to keep their members safe as the coronavirus pandemic rages on. Many have created quarantine facilities, pro-masking efforts and food and cash distribution programs. Others are attempting other stay-home innovations, such as paying for online video streaming and cell phones.

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