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HISTORICAL TRUE CRIME

The son of Minnesota manufacturing millionaire, Haskell Bohn appeared to be a flashy guy. Unfortunately for the Bohn family in St. Paul, Bohn's flash caught the attention of the Sankey Gang, a notorious criminal organization housed out of neighboring Minneapolis.
“Waterville friends of the murderer said he could drop five quail with as many shots, and the unarmed wardens had no chance at all," said a contemporaneous newspaper account of the encounter.
Minnesota in the 1930s. While St. Paul was considered a crook’s haven for mobsters to lay low, the infamous Al Capone was known to wander up North for rest and respite. Some point to St. Paul law enforcement as the key instigators in making Minnesota mob-friendly.
It's been called one of the "scariest," "most haunted" and "creepiest" houses in the Midwest, but what is it really like inside the Villisca Ax Murder House?
Some people claim the devil himself visited the tiny town of Villisca, Iowa, that summer night in 1912, when 8 people were killed by an ax murderer. Others say he already lived among them. After more than a century of idle gossip and speculation, some amateur sleuths might have just figured it out.
Under the bold headline “Murdered for Money,” a Bemidji Daily Pioneer story from June 8, 1904, broke the news that a father and daughter had gone missing from the tiny town of Quiring, Minnesota.

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Husband killed wife, mother-in-law, then himself in apparent money dispute
On Sept. 7, 1876, the notorious James-Younger gang, led the famous outlaw Jesse James, attempted to rob the First National Bank of Northfield, Minnesota. Town citizens, made aware of the robbery attempt, confronted the robbers. The ensuing shootout led to three gang members being killed, three captured and the end of the nation's most dangerous gang of outlaws.
It was a late winter morning when a cashier's son was returning a borrowed typewriter to the Miltona State Bank in Miltona, Minnesota, and discovered a tampered vault door and an empty safe. Cans of cream, filled with water next to the safe, told the tale. The 'Cream Can Gang' had struck again.

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