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FAMILY

"I guess I’m writing this to simply say that grief not only turns your world upside down, it changes it forever. It changes you forever. The world still looks the same, it still operates the same, but you come to understand you’ll never be the same," writes Jill Pertler.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack says distance makes keeping track of your parents' health harder, but barring dementia, they get to choose where they live.
"Don’t give up on yourself. Each day will get just a little bit easier. I’d like to make this a promise, but I’m not sure I can. Let’s make it a hope and trust in that. Let’s trust in ourselves," writes Jill Pertler.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack hears from a reader wondering how to respond when their spouse with dementia sees or talks with his long-deceased parents.

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"There are no coincidences when it comes to serendipity — or friends," writes Jill Pertler.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack says there are ways to help a loved one suffering from aphasia, a disorder resulting from damage to portions of the brain that are responsible for language.
"Don’t wait. Don’t wait. Don’t wait," writes Jill Pertler.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack says the caregiver to a father with Alzheimer's has more than earned this time away, but their conflicted feelings are understandable.
"I miss holding your hand. I miss telling you how to drive. I miss you bringing me coffee in the morning," writes Jill Pertler.
"Home with the Lost Italian" food writer Sarah Nasello says cooking is a wonderful way to bond with children and family, and this family and reader-favorite recipe is designed to be fun and easy to make, no matter your age.

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"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack suggest enlisting the help of a friend or relative, adding that a third party can help remove the dynamic that causes the family conflict.
"You only get the chance to do this once. I’m going to make the most of it. Bring on the roller coasters!" writes Jill Pertler.
As kids, we spent many summers bumping along the dirt roads in Dad’s pickup as he patrolled creeks and ditches — ever vigilant to any splash of yellow representing leafy spurge. He would screech to a halt and we'd trot to the back of the truck to pull out hoses so we could douse every offending patch with herbicide. These days, we are more prone to limping than trotting. But we're still spraying spurge, Tammy Swift says.

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