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RECREATION

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After a virtual event in 2020, the 16th annual run was held in person on the campus in Cloquet.
After retirement from teaching at Robert Asp School in Moorhead, Ralph Fiskness has found a unique way to stay fit and engaged and learn more about small town history in the tri-state region.
Group may be a step toward a more formal club and helping city gain bike friendly status.
In this business, one rarely hears from readers unless they’re mad about something — in my experience, at least — but the column I wrote about the refurbished Coleman camp stove and my long-lost Coleman camping gear definitely seemed to strike a chord.

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Tony and Kathy Mommsen launched their 18½-foot Wenonah Odyssey canoe loaded with two Trek 520 touring bicycles, a small makeshift canoe trailer and various camping gear into the St. Croix River at St. Croix Falls, Wis., on Aug. 2. Since then, they’ve pedaled or paddled across southern Minnesota on an east-west route that eventually took them to the Red River and north to Kittson County near the Manitoba border in far northwest Minnesota.
Cloquet parade starts at 11 a.m., while Duluth event runs noon to 4 p.m. at Bayfront Festival Park.
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This year the race is free for anyone under 18, but will be chip-timed for the first time.
Bicycle shop owner hopes to encourage people from around the state to use the Munger Trail and patronize the businesses along its route.
After most running events were canceled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Sawdust 5K in Cloquet and the Kaleb Anderson Memorial 5K in Cromwell are back this year.
Proceeds from the event went to support local law enforcement K-9 programs.

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Participants will receive a gift card from a local business of their choice for registering.
Pine Valley has long served as an outdoor recreational area for local residents and tourists, with trails used for biking, skiing, running and walking.
Where many industries are struggling to keep viable, outfitters are making hay during an unusually prosperous January.

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