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UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

Northern Minnesota research published in the journal Nature found modest warming may devastate some tree species.
The Minnesota Department of Health's first-ever such study finds high disparities among Indigenous, Black persons, with most deaths in the months following giving birth associated but not related to pregnancy.
The University of Minnesota Board of Regents voted 9-2 despite allegations of impropriety, or at least the appearance of it.
According to a report from the University of Minnesota, 2020 Northland birth and pregnancy rates stayed largely similar to 2019, but are low compared to years past. In most Northland counties, fewer teenage pregnancies and births were recorded in 2020 than in 2019.
Regardless of how bad individual years are, the Minnesota Department of Health is not as concerned with year-to-year trends as it is concerned with the big picture over time, said agency tick disease specialist Elizabeth Schiffman.
Cooperative effort aims to help cattle rancher, wolves and wolf researchers.

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The Minnesota Raptor Center had received nearly 200 birds with confirmed bird flu but only a single owl survived.
Avian flu has hit wild waterfowl and commercial bird populations hard, but data is thin when it comes to songbird transmissions. Due to that, the University of Minnesota Raptor Center is advising people to take down backyard bird feeders and bird baths while the virus is circulating.
Last year, four Northland startups were selected as semifinalists in the competition.

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