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From the editor: Find us on newsstands Fridays

We're changing our production schedule, which means we'll be able to include more content in our weekly print edition, writes Jen Zettel-Vandenhouten.

Cloquet Pine Journal masthead
The Cloquet Pine Journal masthead.
File / Cloquet Pine Journal
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CLOQUET — Starting Dec. 9, the Cloquet Pine Journal will be delivered on Fridays.

The change will allow us to realize efficiencies and opportunities in advertising and news gathering, Neal Ronquist, publisher of Duluth Media Group said.

“Moving the Cloquet Pine Journal’s print publication day aligns it with the Superior Telegram's print publication day, and moves it one day closer to the Duluth News Tribune’s Saturday print publication day,” he said. “The alignment creates advertising efficiencies, advertising opportunities and provides our content team with an extended window to generate even more timely local stories for the print edition. The changes will result in an improved advertising vehicle for our business partners and a better audience experience.”

On the news side, we’re excited to be able to include additional reporting in each week’s issue from events that take place on Wednesday. Playoff prep sports, which sometimes host contests on Wednesdays, for example, are one recent example.

“Having an extra day to gather news and sports content will immediately be noticeable to our readers,” said Rick Lubbers, executive editor of Duluth Media Group. “We are excited to provide this additional print content each week.”

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Of course, all of our reporting is available in real time at pinejournal.com. The website is updated with new content daily.

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Related Topics: CLOQUETCARLTON COUNTY
Jen Zettel-Vandenhouten is the regional editor for Duluth Media Group, overseeing the Cloquet Pine Journal and the Superior Telegram.
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