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Mayo Clinic podcast: Signs of depression in teens and how to help

This edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast features an #AskMayoMom episode hosted by Dr. Angela Mattke, a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center. Joining Mattke to discuss teens and depression are Dr. Paige Partain, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician, and Hannah Mulholland, a Mayo Clinic pediatric social worker.

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Depression is a serious mental health problem that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest in activities. Although depression can occur at any time in life, symptoms may differ between teens and adults.

Issues such as peer pressure, academic expectations and changing bodies can bring a lot of ups and downs for teens. But for some teens, the lows are more than just temporary feelings. They are a symptom of depression.

Treatment for depression depends on the type and severity of the symptoms. A combination of talk therapy and medication can be effective for most teens with depression.

Friday, May 7, is National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day . The goal is to raise awareness about the importance of mental health and highlight how positive mental health is essential to development for children and adolescents.

This edition of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast features an #AskMayoMom episode hosted by Dr. Angela Mattke , a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center . Joining Mattke to discuss teens and depression are Dr. Paige Partain , a Mayo Clinic pediatrician, and Hannah Mulholland, a Mayo Clinic pediatric social worker.

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