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Indulge in a protein-packed blueberry banana smoothie

Want to work more protein and plants into your daily diet? Try a protein-packed blueberry banana smoothie. Viv Williams share her recipe in this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion."

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Add blueberries to a smoothie for great taste and good health . (Getty Images)
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ROCHESTER — I just love blueberries as a food and as a decoration. Blueberries adorn my kitchen towels, are painted on a set of my dishes and every holiday season a few blueberry ornaments hang from our tree. They make me happy.

Plus, blueberries are super tasty and packed with healthy minerals and nutrients. The Blueberry Council's website shows that one cup of blueberries contains only 80 calories. There's also no fat, they are low sodium, full of fiber and rich in vitamin C, K and manganese. What's not to love?

When you pair blueberries with banana and plant-based protein powder, you end up with a fabulous and healthy treat. My recipe for the blueberry banana power smoothie is as follows (makes one serving):

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
  • 1/2 banana
  • 1 serving vanilla, plant-based protein powder
  • 1 cup almond, oat, soy or other milk of choice. Or 1 cup water
  • Handful of ice

Directions:
Put all ingredients into blender, blend to desired thickness and enjoy!

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Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

MORE HEALTH FUSION:
A dog's sense of smell has helped to find missing people, detect drugs at airports and find the tiniest morsel of food dropped from a toddler's highchair. A new study shows that dogs may also be able to sniff out when you're stressed out.

Opinion by Viv Williams
Viv Williams hosts the NewsMD podcast and column, "Health Fusion." She is an Emmy (and other) award-winning health and medical reporter whose stories have run on TV, digital and newspaper outlets nationwide. Viv is passionate about boosting people's health and happiness by helping them access credible, reliable and research-based health information from top experts. She regularly interviews experts and patients from leading medical institutions, such as Mayo Clinic.
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