We see that you have javascript disabled. Please enable javascript and refresh the page to continue reading local news. If you feel you have received this message in error, please contact the customer support team at 1-833-248-7801.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Minnesota orchard marks 60 years, three generations

The 15-acre lot of apple trees in Rochester is now almost 10 times in size since it was purchased in 1962.

Sekapp Orchard
Kem Tong on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, at Sekapp Orchard in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
We are part of The Trust Project.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Fred Kappauf recalls how his parents thought a modest 15-acre orchard would be a good place to raise children.

Kappauf not only grew up there, after college he returned to work the orchard, keep it growing and producing apples.

Now, 60 years since Joyce and Ken Kappauf purchased Sekapp Orchard, a third generation is poised to take over the Rochester business.

Kem Tong, Fred’s daughter, is finishing her studies at the University of Minnesota with online classes while also helping with harvest season at the orchard.

Sekapp Orchard
Sekapp Orchard is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin

Tong said she wasn’t sure she would eventually take over orchard operations until she went to school. Her classes gave her ideas she wants to apply to the family business as she majors in applied economics with a minor in management.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I thought, maybe I can make it a place where I don’t have to struggle,” she said.

Tong said she would like to eventually expand the farmer's market at the orchard with more offerings from nearby producers. She said she might look at ways to expand the seasonal hours to draw families to the orchard earlier in the year. Tong isn’t dreaming of any big changes.

“My plan for the orchard is to keep it a fun place for families to come to,” she said.

Tong’s interest in the business echoes her father’s involvement.

In 1991, Fred Kappauf graduated from college with a manufacturing engineering degree with an emphasis on management. He said he didn’t expect to apply what he learned to running the orchard. However, his father had a heart attack that year, and he came home to the orchard to help during harvest season. That same year, Kappauf had a chance to buy 80 acres of land adjacent to the family orchard. Five years later, he added more than 50 additional acres to the orchard.

It wasn’t just sheer volume of land that improved the orchard, he said.

His parents had their work cut out for them before they were able to reap their first harvest.

They purchased the land in 1962 from Ben Dunn, a horticulture teacher with Rochester Public Schools. Dunn had planted a diverse selection of trees on the original orchard but they weren't in the best of shape, Kappauf recalls.

ADVERTISEMENT

“It took my mom a couple years to whip the trees into shape and get them producing,” Kappauf said. She ran the orchard until 2005.

Sekapp Orchard
Apples are seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, at Sekapp Orchard in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin

Over the years, the family added more varieties of apple trees, a few pear and plum trees, pumpkins and other plants. The farm has 30 acres of apple trees with 20 in full production and 10 acres of trees still growing to maturity.

The orchard also has 75 honeybee hives producing local honey and helping to pollinate the crops.

In 2019, the University of Minnesota honored Sekapp Orchard as its Olmsted County Farm Family of the Year .

This time of year, Kappauf brings on about three dozen workers to help for the season. In the spring, cool weather helped the apple trees hold off from producing blossoms too early and the apple harvest will be bountiful, he said.

However, autumn weather is just as necessary as the spring and summer weather for a successful year. Although the family sells apples at the farmer's market, the bulk of the business comes from visitors to the orchard. He said if it’s rainy and cool, customers will stay away.

Over the decades the orchard has had ups and downs, but Kappauf said he has no regrets taking over the family business.

“I’ve had the best office window view for the last 30 years,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

More photos of Sekapp Orchard

Sekapp Orchard
Sekapp Orchard is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
Sekapp Orchard is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
Kem Tong organizes stakes to design a pumpkin maze on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, at Sekapp Orchard in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
An aerial view of Sekapp Orchard is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
An aerial view of Sekapp Orchard is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
Mini pumpkins are seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, at Sekapp Orchard in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
An aerial view of Sekapp Orchard is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
Gords are seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, at Sekapp Orchard in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
An aerial view of Sekapp Orchard is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
An aerial view of Sekapp Orchard is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin
Sekapp Orchard
An aerial view of Sekapp Orchard is seen on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, in Rochester.
Traci Westcott / Post Bulletin

John Molseed joined the Post Bulletin in 2018. He covers arts, culture, entertainment, nature and other fun stories he's surprised he gets paid to cover. When he's not writing articles about Southeast Minnesota artists and musicians, he's either picking banjo, brewing beer, biking or looking for other hobbies that begin with the letter "b." Readers can reach John at 507-285-7713 or jmolseed@postbulletin.com.
What to read next
Legislators passed a bill this spring to provide $500 million in bonus checks to workers who had to report to their jobs during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic and put themselves at greater risk than those who were able to work remotely.
The rally is Thursday evening at Clyde Iron Works. Duluth is the first stop on their three-city tour of Minnesota.
Members from about a dozen churches countered Graham's evangelical event Sunday with an inclusive, pro-LGBT demonstration.
Opening statements in the trial were scheduled to start Monday morning