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Man dead after being shot by officers during traffic stop in central Minnesota

At one point after the West Central Drug Task Force attempted a traffic stop, a Minnesota State Patrol trooper and an Otter Tail County Sheriff’s Deputy discharged their handguns, fatally striking a white male in the vehicle.

Active emergency lights on top of a police car.
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BOWLUS, Minn. — The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension is investigating an officer involved shooting that happened just before 6 p.m. Thursday, April 28, near Bowlus in Morrison County.

At one point after the West Central Drug Task Force attempted a traffic stop, a Minnesota State Patrol trooper and an Otter Tail County Sheriff’s Deputy discharged their handguns, fatally striking a white male in the vehicle, the BCA reported. Another person in the vehicle was injured by gunfire. A handgun was recovered at the scene.

This investigation is still in the very early stages. The trooper involved was wearing a body camera which captured portions of the incident. More information will be released pending further investigation.
Bowlus is about 47 miles south of Brainerd.

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