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2022 Kettle River mayoral race: Doward challenges Lucas

City Councilor Monique Doward is running against incumbent Mayor David Lucas.

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USA flag. American flag. American flag blowing in the wind.
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KETTLE RIVER — Voters in Kettle River will cast ballots Nov. 8 for mayor, choosing between the incumbent David Lucas and city councilor Monique Doward.

The Cloquet Pine Journal sent questionnaires to the candidates ahead of the election. Lucas did not submit responses. Doward's responses are below. They have been edited for style and grammar.

Monique Doward

Age: 39

Family: Two children

Occupation: A public health analyst previously working with the Minnesota Department of Health; Bachelor of Science degree in public health from the University of the Cumberlands; currently attends Bemidji State University working towards a Master of Science degree in biology.

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Community involvement: Minnesota Master Gardener volunteer.

Previous experience in elected office: Kettle River City Council member since 2021.

Why are you running for office?

Monique Doward
Monique Doward
Contributed / Monique Doward

The city desperately lacks leadership within the council, which reflects poor management of city taxpayer dollars. Seeing this firsthand as a council member myself, I'm appalled at the malfeasance and unethical business practices. These past events have swayed my decision in running for the open seat of mayor.

What are the big challenges you see facing the community?

Transparency is the biggest challenge the community is facing.

If elected, how would you work to address those issues?

I would look to address all of these matters and put out a public notice of corrections where needed; sort out the water quality and billing to assure public safety; upgrade both city parks through grant funding and reasonable budgeting; take an interest in public opinion input with community concerns; amend the negativity that plagues our city from the mismanagement of the city council; be transparent and ethical; develop a five-year city strategic plan with the entire council for the community; assess and work on ways to decrease the city's debt; and bring in new business opportunities — the city could use an upgrade of redevelopment.

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What successes do you hope to build on if elected?

I would reestablish trust with a warm community feel involving all families. I plan to be transparent with council, staff, community and businesses.

Our newsroom occasionally reports stories under a byline of "staff." Often, the "staff" byline is used when rewriting basic news briefs that originate from official sources, such as a city press release about a road closure, and which require little or no reporting. At times, this byline is used when a news story includes numerous authors or when the story is formed by aggregating previously reported news from various sources. If outside sources are used, it is noted within the story.
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