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It has been a bad year for rollovers

"Probably 30 percent of our crashes have been rollovers," said Minnesota State Patrol Trooper Dave Vereecken. "The car starts to slide sideways, then one side starts to grip and the car goes over. Fortunately, there have been very few injuries be...

"Probably 30 percent of our crashes have been rollovers," said Minnesota State Patrol Trooper Dave Vereecken. "The car starts to slide sideways, then one side starts to grip and the car goes over. Fortunately, there have been very few injuries because we've had a lot of belted people."

He's also seen a number of four-wheel drive trucks in the ditch or upside down, often because drivers mistakenly assume they can "push it" and drive faster in the snow just because they have four-wheel drive.

The 10-year state trooper blames frequent snowfall and people not slowing down when there's only an inch or two of snow. However, it only takes a little snow before the roads get "greasy" and difficult for tires to grip.

"You get four or five inches, people know it's really snowing and they slow down," he said. "Get just a little bit of snow and people keep driving likes it's OK. They need to slow down anytime it starts to snow."

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