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Free GED online prep now provided by Minnesota Department of Education

The Minnesota Department of Education announced a new online instructional program for Minnesotans who are preparing for their General Educational Development Diploma (GED). GED-i, a nationally-recognized and teacher-facilitated service, is free ...

The Minnesota Department of Education announced a new online instructional program for Minnesotans who are preparing for their General Educational Development Diploma (GED). GED-i, a nationally-recognized and teacher-facilitated service, is free to Minnesota students.

"This is an important resource for people who are working toward their GED diploma," said Commissioner Seagren. "For many Minnesotans, transportation, child care and work obligations have kept them from going to class to prepare for the GED test. This new program will make GED preparation much more accessible."

GED-i learning is facilitated by instructors from local adult education programs. Registered students will work with a licensed teacher from their local Adult Basic Education (ABE) program in an online environment. Instructional content can be accessed on the Internet at any time.

According to the 2007 American Community Survey, 10 percent (388,074) of Minnesotans over the age of 18 lack high school equivalency.

Individuals who do not have their high school diploma or equivalent (GED) are at a severe disadvantage in the increasingly competitive job market.

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The GED-i program is an online preparation program only; the GED test itself must be taken in person at a GED examination center. Student enrollment in person at an ABE provider site is also required.

For location information about local ABE and GED-i provider, visit http://www.themlc.org/hotline.html or call the Minnesota Adult Literacy Hotline at 1-800-222-1990. For additional information about the GED test itself, visit the GED information Web site at http://mnabe.themlc.org/GED2.html .

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