In honor of Black History Month, the Pine Journal asked staff at the Cloquet Public Library to recommend titles of books children, teenagers and adults can check out to learn more about Black history and culture.

See their recommendations below:

RELATED: FDLTCC organizes webinars in honor of Black History Month

Children

"Lillian's Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965" by Jonah Winter

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"This story was inspired by the true story of Lillian Allen, a 100-year-old African American woman, who makes a 'long haul up a steep hill' to her polling place. Lillian's story highlights the overview of Civil Rights history as a metaphor to revisit key points in the history of African Americans’ struggle for getting the right to vote." -Cloquet children's librarian Keiko Satomi

"New Kid" by Jerry Craft

"You might be skeptical about Graphic Novel as a literature genre, but I found the title as a perfect example of why some graphic novels can serve its purpose even better than regular fiction. The book portrays the daily life of youth of color so realistically to the details that you could feel the exhaustion of those characters." -Satomi

"This Promise of Change: One Girl’s Story in the Fight for School Equality" by Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy

"This Promise of Change: One Girl’s Story in the Fight for School Equality" by Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"This Promise of Change: One Girl’s Story in the Fight for School Equality" by Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"This is a memoir of the 14-year-old girl, Jo Ann Allen. She was one of 12 African American students who broke the color barrier and integrated Clinton High School in Tennessee in 1956. The memoir in free verse, geared for middle grade students, is compelling, absorbing and elegantly written." -Satomi

"This Book Is Anti-Racist: 20 Lessons on How to Wake Up, Take Action, and Do the Work" by Tiffany Jewell

"This Book Is Anti-Racist: 20 Lessons on How to Wake Up, Take Action, and Do the Work" by Tiffany Jewell. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"This Book Is Anti-Racist: 20 Lessons on How to Wake Up, Take Action, and Do the Work" by Tiffany Jewell. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"Who are you? What is racism? Where does it come from? Why does it exist? What can you do to disrupt it? In this book, you can learn from the author, Tiffany Jewell, who is an anti-bias, anti-racist educator and activist, about social identities, the history of racism and resistance against it, and how you can use your anti-racist lens and voice to move the world toward equity and liberation. The book is geared for children ages 10 and up, but it would be a good read for grown-ups as well." -Satomi

"A Good Kind of Trouble" by Lisa Moore Ramée

"A Good Kind of Trouble"  by Lisa Moore Ramée. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"A Good Kind of Trouble"  by Lisa Moore Ramée. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"Good stories often serve as a window to a [broader] world, and that is why accuracy in the story matters. The #OwnVoices author, Lisa Moore Ramee, effectively portrays the importance of the Black Lives Matter movement and the struggle of navigating complex social situations while carrying universal questions about friendship, first crushes and identity as a middle school girl." -Satomi

"All the Colors We Are: The Story of How We Get Our Skin Color" by Katie Kissinger

"All the Colors We Are: The Story of How We Get Our Skin Color" by Katie Kissinger. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"All the Colors We Are: The Story of How We Get Our Skin Color" by Katie Kissinger. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"This straightforward but accurate and child-friendly book about different skin colors and tones can be a good conversation starter between a child and caregiver(s), and be an aid to answer children’s questions and curiosity about our differences." -Satomi

Teens

"Things That Make White People Uncomfortable" by Michael Bennett

"Things That Make White People Uncomfortable" by Michael Bennett. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"Things That Make White People Uncomfortable" by Michael Bennett. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"I picked this book because it was written by former NFL player Michael Bennett. It is funny, relevant and important." -Cloquet teen librarian Justin Dinger

"SLAY" by Brittney Norris

"SLAY" by Brittney Norris. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"SLAY" by Brittney Norris. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"This book very uniquely portrays many aspects of Black culture in the United States and around the world. Most of the action takes place in an online game, something many teens can connect with." -Dinger

"Excellence, Volume I: Kill the Past" by Brandon Thomas, Khary Randolph and Emilio López

"Excellence, Volume I: Kill the Past" by Brandon Thomas, Khary Randolph and Emilio López. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"Excellence, Volume I: Kill the Past" by Brandon Thomas, Khary Randolph and Emilio López. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"A graphic novel: teens want and deserve to see people that look like them as the hero." -Justin Dinger

Adults

"Between the World and Me" by Ta-Nehisi Coates

"Between the World and Me" by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"Between the World and Me" by Ta-Nehisi Coates. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"This memoir offers a fresh perspective on race and how the concept has been used to justify oppression of minorities, especially Black (people)." -Cloquet adult librarian Courtney Dietsche

"The New Jim Crow" by Michelle Alexander

"The New Jim Crow" by Michelle Alexander. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"The New Jim Crow" by Michelle Alexander. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"The author examines the effect race has on incarceration in the criminal justice system, and the impact of this book has continued until the present day." -Dietsche

"Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents" by Isabel Wilkerson

"Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents" by Isabel Wilkerson. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents" by Isabel Wilkerson. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"This book explores a subject that most people are not comfortable thinking about or discussing, but it is a necessary conversation to have." -Dietsche

"How to Be an Antiracist" by Ibram X. Kendi

"How to Be an Antiracist" by Ibram X. Kendi. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"How to Be an Antiracist" by Ibram X. Kendi. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"Kendi explores the idea that our struggle to work toward seeing each other as fully human is ongoing, but necessary." -Dietsche

"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" by Frederick Douglass

"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" by Frederick Douglass. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)
"Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" by Frederick Douglass. (Photo courtesy of Cloquet Public Library)


"This first-hand account of slavery is a classic, and it provides an historical perspective to balance the modern books on the list." -Dietsche