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Cloquet teen's essay wins national honors

Kelly Carlson, a 16-year-old Cloquet student, has been named runner-up in the Legacy Project's national "Listen to a Life" essay contest. The annual contest, run in partnership with Generations United in Washington, DC, receives thousands of entr...

Kelly Carlson, a 16-year-old Cloquet student, has been named runner-up in the Legacy Project's national "Listen to a Life" essay contest.

The annual contest, run in partnership with Generations United in Washington, DC, receives thousands of entries from across the country.

Carlson was encouraged to enter the national contest by her English teacher, Jason Richardson, at Cloquet Senior High School.

In her essay, Carlson tells the story of her 78-year-old grandfather, Freeman Johansen, and how love helped him through his life, including his wife's eight-year battle with Alzheimer's.

She concludes her essay with her grandfather's advice to "love with your whole heart; after all, that's why it's there."

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To enter the "Listen to a Life Contest," young people ages 8-18 interview a grand-parent or "grandfriend" 50 years or older about the older person's hopes and goals through their life, how they achieved their goals and overcame obstacles, or key life experiences.

The young person then writes a 300-word essay based on the interview.

For her prize-winning effort, Carlson was awarded $400 in Orchard software and an MP3 player.

Entrants in the contest spanned from Los Angeles to New York. The oldest person interviewed was 101 years old, while the youngest entrants were 8 years old.

The next "Listen to a Life" contest begins Sept. 12, which is National Grandparents Day. The Legacy Project is a national education project that offers parents and teachers ideas and activities for building closer relationships across generations. Generations United is the nation's largest organization promoting intergenerational strategies, programs, and

policies.

To read all the winning stories and get free Across Generations activity ideas,

visit www.legacyproject.org .

Related Topics: CLOQUETEDUCATION
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