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Cloquet High School student Courtney Jackson is published author

Courtney Jackson, a student at Cloquet Senior High School, may only be a 10th-grader, but she is also a published author. John Hopkins University's Center for Talented Youth featured Jackson's article in their 2008 November-December journal title...

Courtney Jackson, a student at Cloquet Senior High School, may only be a 10th-grader, but she is also a published author.

John Hopkins University's Center for Talented Youth featured Jackson's article in their 2008 November-December journal titled, "Imagine - big ideas for bright minds" (Volume 16, Number 2).

Her article tells the story of her ninth-grade science research project on "Mapping Venus." Jackson has been working with her science teacher, Cynthia Welsh, since seventh grade. Initially, she investigated the effect of acid rain on tardigrade (water bear) populations.

When Jackson was a freshman, Welsh introduced her to Dr. Vicki Hansen, a geology professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth, whose research involves mapping the surface of Venus using Magellan radar and altimetry dates.

Hansen lent Jackson an external monitor and the program to do the mapping and instructed Jackson in the art of geologic mapping.

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This year Jackson is again mapping a more complicated area of Venus.

Jackson has had much success during her science fair research career. She just attended the American Indian Science and Engineering Society's (AISES) National Professional Conference in Anaheim, Calif., where she and Elizabeth Rilea, a Cloquet 10th-grader, presented their research.

Rilea's research involves using birch bark to control mold growth while storing wild rice. Jackson placed second and Rilea third among the other high school presenters at the conference.

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