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Carlton's new water tower goes up, up, up

Anyone driving south on Highway 45 into Carlton this week will no doubt notice a new edifice towering over the town. Standing at 181 feet tall, the new water tower was erected last Thursday and Friday by crews from MacGuire Iron in South Dakota a...

Anyone driving south on Highway 45 into Carlton this week will no doubt notice a new edifice towering over the town.

Standing at 181 feet tall, the new water tower was erected last Thursday and Friday by crews from MacGuire Iron in South Dakota and Truck Crane in Eagan, Minn.

The tower, next to the Four Seasons Sports Complex, was moved into place in pieces - the heaviest being the stem at 96,000 pounds. The two pieces forming the bowl at the top weighed some 35,000 pounds each, according to Joe Nirmaier, crane operator.

In all, a crew of six men worked to put the tower in place and as the pieces were moved, the current outdated tower seemed to shrink in size.

"It is impressive and amazing to see [the new tower] as you come into town," said Brent Neisinger, Carlton public works superintendent.

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Crews will continue with construction, welding the structure in place and painting it two-tone blue before it is finished and ready for water in the spring.

The tower will have a capacity of 300,651 gallons of water when full and will serve the Carlton, Thomson and Jay Cooke areas. Service may also expand west into Twin Lakes Township in the future.

The old tower, located adjacent to the Third Base Bar in downtown Carlton, is scheduled to be dismantled shortly after the new one is operational. Much of Carlton had to be closed down for a day in December after fighting an apartment fire tapped the current water resources.

A dedication for the new tower is planned for next summer's Carlton Daze celebration.

"This is a milestone for Carlton," said Carlton Mayor Dennis Randelin at the October ground-breaking ceremony. "The last time we did this was 100 years ago."

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