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Carbon monoxide issues at Moose Lake Arena resolved

The air is clearer at the Moose Lake Riverside Arena these days thanks to a grant and the resulting much needed new equipment. The city of Moose Lake, in partnership with the Moose Lake Area Hockey Association, received a matching grant from the ...

Posing in front of the new electric Olympia ice resurfacer are, from left: Dan Benzie, Moose Lake Hockey Association; state Sen. Tony Lourey; Ted Shaw, Moose Lake mayor; Guyal Nelson, Riverside Arena manager; and Chris Micheals, CTM Services sales representative Submitted photo
Posing in front of the new electric Olympia ice resurfacer are, from left: Dan Benzie, Moose Lake Hockey Association; state Sen. Tony Lourey; Ted Shaw, Moose Lake mayor; Guyal Nelson, Riverside Arena manager; and Chris Micheals, CTM Services sales representative Submitted photo

The air is clearer at the Moose Lake Riverside Arena these days thanks to a grant and the resulting much needed new equipment.

The city of Moose Lake, in partnership with the Moose Lake Area Hockey Association, received a matching grant from the James Metzen Mighty Ducks Foundation. According to City Administrator Tim Peterson, the three major projects in the arena totaled $250,000, of which $125,000 came from the grant. Support for the Moose Lake Riverside Arena and its grant submittal came from many in the area, including state Sen. Tony Lourey and Rep. Mike Sundin.

The grant application was submitted in fall 2016. The fun began in January 2017. Projects included a new red electric ice resurfacer from Olympia, a new dehumidification system and an air exchanger for locker rooms.

The electric ice resurfacer lowers carbon monoxide (CO) levels in the arena to a safe level for participants and fans, from 20-30 ppm to less than 5 ppm.

"The air is perfect!" rink manager Guyal Nelson exclaimed. "Now we're carbon-monoxide free." The 17-year-old resurfacer they had been using inside will be used for the outdoor rinks.

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"The Olympia is the Cadillac of ice resurfacers," Nelson said. "They've come a long way in 18 years."

The air exchanger in the girls' locker room brings fresh outside air into the locker rooms and improves air quality.

"Now there is no more stalagmites," Nelson said. The excess moisture caused water to drip from the ceiling. When it got cold, the dripping water froze.

The existing ice plant was installed in 1995, also with a Mighty Ducks grant. When new doors and insulation in the ceiling were added to the building over the years, it resulted in a more airtight building.

"Unfortunately these improvements as well as some warmer winter and shoulder season temperatures increased CO levels," Peterson said. "Over the past several seasons, we have seen a need to postpone and in some cases even cancel events until CO levels improved. We have even had to play several events with large overhead doors open to improve CO levels."

The dehumidification system will drop the dew point during late fall and early spring, from 50-60 down to 34.

The projects are designed to improve air quality for the public, participants, building infrastructure and the energy consumption of the ice compressors in the 33-year-old facility.

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