John Wheeler

John Wheeler

Meteorologist

John Wheeler is Chief Meteorologist for WDAY, a position he has had since May of 1985. Wheeler grew up in the South, in Louisiana and Alabama, and cites his family's move to the Midwest as important to developing his fascination with weather and climate. Wheeler lived in Wisconsin and Iowa as a teenager. He attended Iowa State University and achieved a B.S. degree in Meteorology in 1984. Wheeler worked about a year at WOI-TV in central Iowa before moving to Fargo and WDAY..

Wheeler covers weather for WDAY TV and radio, as well as for The Forum and for inforum.com. Most meteorologists find stormy and extreme weather fascinating and Wheeler is no exception, but his biggest interest is severe winter weather.

At great distances, the sound of thunder is dampened, so that sometimes you only see a silent, reflected flash of lightning a long distance away.
These trends are measurable, but subtle.
NOAA will use this computer upgrade to launch new model applications starting this fall.
Hail forms in the updraft region of a strong thunderstorm.
Often times during our most humid weather; the fronts, lows, and other dynamics of the atmosphere are weak.
On average, our hottest time of the year is from mid-July to mid-August.
From June 24 through June 26 this year, the official sunset time in Fortuna, ND, is 10:03 pm.
La Niña is going strong after two years and appears poised to re-strengthen for a third consecutive winter.
If Lake Mead falls another 150 feet, water will not be able to flow beyond the dam.
Beauty from a weather perspective.