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MINNESOTA LEGISLATURE

While metro races will be front and center in the contest for the House, other Greater Minnesota regions could make a big difference in the Senate, where Democrats hold 31 seats. Historic Democratic strongholds in northeast Minnesota’s Iron Range appear to be leaning more toward Republicans, and population centers like Rochester have started to lean more Democratic as they grow and change demographically.
Minnesota set its current goals in 2007 when the state adopted the bipartisan Next Generation Energy Act, which called for an 80% reduction in 2005-level emissions by 2050.
In July, edible cannabis products became legal in the state, but the legislation that opened up that door had minimal regulation and no taxation requirements.
The report from Senate Education Chair Roger Chamberlain asserts the Minnesota Department of Education did not take proper safeguards against fraud, which “greatly magnified the scope of the loss.” His DFL counterpart on the education committee called the report "partisan" and one-sided." The education department has stood by the way it approached tens of millions in fraud at the nonprofit Feeding Our Future.
Minnesota is among a group of states that have not conformed their codes to a federal law exempting student loan debt forgiveness from taxes. Changing that has bipartisan backing, but any action will likely have to wait until January when lawmakers return to the capitol in St. Paul for the regular session.
From the column: "Child-care centers across Minnesota are asking the state to continue the stabilization grants — or we may not have a child-care system at all."

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The top priority for Minnesota anti-abortion groups following the overturning of Roe v. Wade is winning elections in November. But even with the state Legislature and governor's office, passing sweeping bans could be a far reach.
Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz is floating a proposal to double the original $500 "Walz checks" he pitched earlier this year. But the odds of that happening appear slim as lawmakers failed to reach a deal to return to the Capitol for a special legislative session.
The Minnesota Legislature ended its regular session in May without making any decisions on how to use a historic 9.25 billion surplus or passing public projects borrowing bill.

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